Observatories: Nottinghamshire

Bush’s Mapperley Observatory [BMON] (1877-89), Mapperley House, Thyra Grove, Nottingham, established by T.W. Bush in the grounds of his new home.  It is not clear which of the many reflecting telescope he built were installed, but the facility was equipped with a transit so he could utilise both the regulator clock and spectroscope that had been given to him in the past (Chapman 1998, 202).

Highfield House Observatory [HHO] (1850s-1882), Lenton, Nottingham, established Alfred Lowe on the roof of thehouse.  Later used by Edward J Lowe after 1866 when he moved to the House from Broadgate House (Cox 2004, 9-10).

Hunt’s Observatory [HuO] (1930s-50?), West Bridgeford, Nottingham, established by W. Hunt with a 5-inch Refractor by Cook, Troughton & Simms on a Grubb mount – same instrument as used by Northrop (Northrop 1980).

Lawson Beeston Observatory [LON] (1851-1866), Beeston, Nottingham, established by Edward J. Lowe at his home Broadgate House, Beeston, Nottingham. Including many meteorological instruments given to him by Henry Lawson, the observatory housed his own 11-foot  refractor  (4-inch OG) and a transit instrument (Cox 2004, 8-9).

Lowe’s Observatory [LoOB] (1850s-1866), Beeston, Nottingham, established by  Alfred Lowe the father of Edward J Lowe.  Known as ‘The Lighthouse’, he had an octagonal tower built for weather observations (Cox 2004, p.9).

Nottingham Astronomical Society’s Observatory [NASO] (2006- ), Cotgrave, Nottingham, established by the Nottingham Astronomical Society. It houses a 24-inch reflecting telescope, with sketal tube on a fork mount, built by Beacon Hill Telescopes (Dawson and Griffin 2017).

Sherwood Observatory [SO] (1986- ), Sutton-in-Ashfield, established by the Mansfield & Sutton astronomical Society.  The observatory houses a society built 24-inch (61-cm) reflecting telescope, with sketal tube on a fork mount, and primary mirror made by Vacuum Coatings.

Whitaker’s Observatory [WO] (1940s-1950s), Nottingham, established by  Dr John Vaughan Whitaker using a 10-inch f8 Newtonian and observatory that he purchased from the estate of Richard F.T. Granger (Northrop 1980).