Astronomers: Midlothian

 

Anderson, Thomas David (1853-1932), born in Edinburgh February 6 1853, educated at Edinburgh University, where he graduated M.A. and later D. Sc. He qualified for the ministry of the Congregational Church, but never held a charge and devoted his life to astronomy. With slender optical means he discovered over 50 variable stars and also the famous temporary stars Nova Aurigae (1892) and Nova Persei ( 1901). Resident in Edinburgh until 1904, he later moved to East Lothian and died at Edrom, Berwickshire, March 31, 1932.

Baikie, James, Rev., DD, FRAS (1866-1931), born in Lasswade, lectured in astronomy to troops on the Western Front, Wrote several books incl. Through the Telescope 1906 and Peeps at the Heavens 1911

Blair, Robert (1748–1828), born Garwald, East Lothian, trained as a naval surgeon.  Through his study of navigation instrument he was appointed to the new chair of practical astronomy at Edinburgh University where he worked on optical aberration of lenses (see Wikipedia & ODNB).

Brück, Mary T., Dr. [nee Conway] (1925-2008), born in Ballivor, Co. Meath, Ireland, carried out solar work at Dunsink, later moving to Scotland as  senior lecturer in Astronomy at Edinburgh University. She was married to Prof. Hermann A Bruck who was Director of Dunsink observatory (see obituary in SHA Bulletin issue 18 June 2009).

Copeland, Ralph (1837-1905), born at Moorside Farm, Wood Plumpton, astronomer and third Astronomer Royal for Scotland. He worked at theDun Echt Observatory owned by the 26th Earl of Crawford and undertook worldwide expeditions, observing the 1874 and 1882 transits of Venus from Mauritius andJamaica. (See ODNBWikipedia; Lancashire)

Douglas, James, fourteenth earl of Morton (1702–1768), was a Scottish astronomer and representative peer who was President of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh from its foundation in 1737 until his death. He also became President of the Royal Society (24 March 1764), and was a distinguished patron of science, and particularly of astronomy (see ODNB).

Henderson, Thomas (1798-1844), born in Dundee, worked at Carlton Hill Observatory and then the Cape Observatory – see below (ODNB).

IInnes, Robert Thorburn Ayton (1861-1933), born Edinburgh. Self-educated, he built a successful wine business in Australia, and in 1894 borrowed a 6¼-inch refractor and swiftly discovered new double stars. David Gill recruited him to the Cape, where he became the leading South African astronomer of his time. Double stars remained his primary interest, and he discovered 1,628 of them (see ODNB).

Nasmyth, James (1808-1890), was born at 47 York Place, Edinburgh. Largely self-educated. At Eccles in Lancashire, he started his own business making machine tools, and made a fortune. His most famous of several inventions was the steam hammer. He was interested in astronomy before 1827, in which year he constructed a very effective reflecting telescope of 6″ aperture. In 1840 he was experimenting with different proportions for speculum mirrors, and completed a 10″ that was greatly admired by his new friend William Lassell, a friendship and cooperation that lasted 40 years. In 1843 he reported observations of a comet. By about 1845 he had completed his new 20-inch reflector, and began many years of lunar observations. In 1856 he retired to Penshurst, Kent. See Kent, Nasmyth’s Observatory, Penshurst (see ODNB).

Sandeman, Patrick (1822-fl.1861), born Leith, Midlothian, Scotland, listed as astronomer (see 1861 Census for Scotland).

Scott, James Lidderdale,  FRAS (1848-1908), merchant, born Edinburgh, took up astronomy aged 40. owned 127mm Cooke-Casella refractor.

Short, James (1710-1768), born in Edinburgh and educated there. His skill as a telescope maker gained him election to the Royal Society of London in 1737. He obtained patronage, participated in observations, and produced about 180 telescopes before moving to London in 1738. At his workshop in the Strand he made about 1,200 telescopes (see: ODNB).

Smith, Charles Frederick Ortmann  (1874-1949), of Edinburgh, had a 16cm Newtonian reflector, but later obtained a  15-cm Wray refractor housed in a run-off shed. After 1946 he published excellent papers on Jupiter. A member of “Mr Barker’s Circle”, an observing group of eight men active from April 1934 to December 1938 and May 1946 to May 1948 (See McKim 2013).

Smyth, Charles Piazzi (1819-1900) – see Calton Hill Observatory

Wallace, Alexander (1834-80) – see Calton Hill Observatory

Williamson, Peter (1827-fl.1860s) – see Calton Hill Observatory

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